The 10 U.S. States With The Highest Rates Of COVID-19

The coronavirus pandemic continues to affect the lives of people around the world. In the United States, the virus has spread rapidly, especially in cities with higher populations. From rural towns to densely populated cities, the U.S. has the highest number of confirmed cases around the world.

As of August 11th, 2020, more than 5.1 million people in the U.S. have been infected by the coronavirus, while the coronavirus death toll amounts to roughly 163,200. Unfortunately, health experts believe that the infection rate is much higher than official tallies. For instance, California’s database experienced technical difficulties, which delayed the tallying of new confirmed cases. This is not just in California, though; and officials expect a huge uptick in numbers as the computer systems update.

Why Do Cases Keep Rising?

There is no simple way to answer this question, and we can only do our best to provide the facts that contribute to the spread of the coronavirus. The virus spreads rapidly, so it can continue to spread even with shutdown or stay-at-home orders in place. The virus also spreads from people who are both presymptomatic and asymptomatic. Additionally, many people refuse to practice social distancing and don’t wear masks, as certain states don’t require them to be worn in public settings. The inability for everyone to follow the same orders contributes to the continued spread of the virus.

Top 10 States/Territories With Highest Rates Of COVID-19:

As of August 11th, 2020, the following states have the highest case rates of COVID-19

  1. California (561,911 total cases)
  2. Florida (531,188 total cases)
  3. Texas (490,817 total cases)
  4. New York City (229,557 total cases)
  5. Georgia (219,025 total cases)
  6. Illinois (196,699 total cases)
  7. New York (193,267 total cases)
  8. Arizona (187,523 total cases)
  9. New Jersey (185,031 total cases)
  10. North Carolina (136,844 total cases)

The Places Hit Hardest By Coronavirus:

It’s no secret that California and New York, and now Florida, were hit the hardest by the coronavirus pandemic. The high state populations contributed to the extreme spikes in cases. Hawaii and Vermont, which are much less populated, have fewer than 5,000 confirmed total cases of COVID-19. But big cities aren’t the only areas suffering. Small rural towns and cities in the Midwest and the South have been hit hard. A recent report, from the beginning of July to the present, found that 85% of the deaths in McAllen, Texas were all coronavirus deaths. Other rural towns that have been hit hard lately include:

  • Baker FL
  • Karnes, TX
  • Clarke, AL
  • Martinsville, VA
  • Chicot, AR
  • Bee, TX
  • Dixie, FL

What was considered “normal life” is no longer normal for millions of Americans. Concerts, sports games, restaurant dining, and more are either cancelled or majorly altered. Unemployment cases continue to rise and many schools and colleges have cancelled in-person classes for the fall 2020 semester. It’s a new world and we have to do all that we can to be a healthier nation moving forward. Please do your part to benefit our beautiful nation.

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#cases
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/coronavirus-us-cases.html
https://usafacts.org/visualizations/coronavirus-covid-19-spread-map/
https://www.advisory.com/daily-briefing/2020/06/18/covid-update

2020-08-14T10:50:57-07:00